Saturday, November 20, 2021

Huntley Meadows Park

   In the antebellum era Huntley Meadows was part of a large plantation owned by the Mason family. Thomas Francis Mason built a house on a hill in 1825 where he could sit on the front porch and overlook his holdings. The house has been restored and is open for tours at 10:30, spring through fall. Interpretive signs explain the history and uses of the three buildings on the property.
   The meadows has reverted to a forest and wetlands environment with a 1.7 mile trail of boardwalk and hard packed dirt that starts at the Nature Center and circles a small pond. Another 1 mile trail goes from the wetland to the house. There’s also a 1 mile paved trail from the South Kings Highway parking lot – designated as Huntley Meadows Park Area 3 on Google maps.
       The Nature Center is accessible. The trail around the pond is accessible. The trail to the house is hardpacked dirt and asphalt in poor condition and not marked well. Visitor with mobility issue should drive to the house. The brick road to the house from the small parking lot is steeply uphill. We did not tour the house interior but it looks like the first floor is accessible. We did not take the trail from the South Kings Highway parking lot.
  The parking lot at the Nature Center is small and may fill on the weekends. Large RVs may not fit.  The South Kings Highway parking lot is small with only one entrance/exit. It may be possible to park smaller RVs by backing up over the grass. Park  38.75778, -77.09856

5 comments:

  1. I've been wondering where you guys are at? On the east coast! Does that mean I won't see you in AZ this winter? Hope all is well! Sending love!

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  2. Hi Cyndi! Good to hear from you. We'll be in Quartzsite for the RTR. Looking forward to seeing you again!

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  3. Rich guy builds a mansion on a hill so "he could sit on the front porch and overlook his holdings." Geez, life was good, huh? For some. Well, I wouldn't mind seeing the place and walking the grounds.

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    1. Yes, and sadly he was looking over all the work done by his slaves.

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