Monday, March 19, 2018

Natchez Trace – Mile 327.8 to Mile 444.0

IMG_0792

Mile 327  Colbert Ferry – George Colbert, who was three-fourths Chickasaw and one quarter Scottish, owned a ferry, inn, and a substantial plantation along the Tennessee River. He died in 1839 at age 75 after the Chickasaw were forced to move to Oklahoma. Drive to overlook as trails are not accessible.

       IMG_0785 

IMG_0786

Mile 375.8  Old Trace Drive – 2.5 mile drive along the old trace. One of the few places where RVs are prohibited.

IMG_0799

Mile 382.8  Metal Ford – Slag pile and evidence of mill race from 1820 charcoal burning furnace used to manufacture pig iron. Short trail is not accessible.

       IMG_0804

IMG_0802

Mile 385.9   Meriwether Lewis Campground and Gravesite – Meriwether Lewis, famous from the Lewis and Clark Expedition, stayed overnight at this location in 1809. He was found in his room on October 11, dead from a gunshot wound, and there’s still debate about whether it was a murder or suicide.  A memorial marks his burial site. A small reconstructed cabin has exhibits. A short, hard surfaced and accessible trail leads to a section of the trace.

         IMG_0819

IMG_0812

        IMG_0813

A free campground has 32 sites with paved parking pads, tables and fire rings. The accessible site has concrete under the table and is close to the restroom.

IMG_0808

Mile 391.9    Falls Hollow – Small scenic waterfall. A short paved trail leads to an overlook. The trail has a steep section and is accessible with assistance.

IMG_0824

         IMG_0826

Mile 401.1  Tobacco Farm – Old barn with interpretive signs about tobacco farming and processing.

IMG_0827

Mile 405.1  Bakers Bluff Overlook – Pretty view of the valley farms.

IMG_0831

Mile 444.0  Northern Terminus – We were expecting a little more but this is it. Just a gate ready to be swung shut if the road is snowy or icy.

IMG_0839

In conclusion – We really enjoyed driving along the trace and learning a bit of the history.  We drive slowly and didn’t get started each day until after lunch so it took us seven days to drive the trace. We stayed at three campgrounds on the trace, one campground slightly off of the trace, and in Walmart lots at Jackson and Tupelo. We stopped and read every sign and tried to see the sights that required a short walk but were disappointed at the lack of wheelchair accessibility. Most of the short trails were made years ago and haven’t been upgraded.   Trace  34.8361, -87.94272

tennessee1

5 comments:

  1. Thank you for taking time to share your experiences with opinions;) happy safe journey for you both.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You're welcome! Happy safe journey to you too.

      Delete
  2. And I hope you missed all that bad weather that went through the south.... Loved your blogs about Natchez Trace, thanks.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. We've been lucky. As you can see from the photos we had pretty good weather on the trace. We've been in Nashville for a few days and yesterday when everyone south was getting wind, rain, and hail we just got a little rain and cold temperatures.

      Delete
  3. Thanks for the great photos -- The Trace looks so lovely, and I've never been (close doesn't count, does it?). Maybe someday.

    ReplyDelete