Monday, May 4, 2015

Aerospace Museum of California

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   The best way to experience the outdoor exhibits in this small museum is by a guided tour with one of the volunteers. Many are ex-pilots or airplane mechanics and can tell you the history of each plane and answer any questions. Some of the planes may be entered with a guided tour. Several short films run continuously in the indoor display area.

   Both indoor and outdoor display areas are accessible. The interiors of the planes are not accessible. Most of the signs are easy to view. The volume on the films is low and may be difficult to hear. (noisy school groups on the day we visited)

   RVs will fit in the lot by parking through two spaces or lengthwise across the spaces.   Museum

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Sunday, May 3, 2015

Sacramento Zoo

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  Because of it’s small size, in both the amount of acreage and the number of animals, this entire zoo can be seen in a little more than an hour. The animals seem to be well cared for but some of the enclosures should be larger. The landscaping provides plenty of shade along the paths.

  The paths are paved, in good condition, and flat except for one short hill where visitors in wheelchairs may need to have help. The design of the enclosures allows all visitors a good view of the animals.

  The zoo does not have a parking lot but it’s part of Land Park which has plenty of free on-street parking. We parked just off of Land Park Drive, near the ball fields, and walked/rolled to the zoo entrance along a paved path.  Zoo
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Saturday, May 2, 2015

Crocker Art Museum

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  The Crocker Art Museum is located in the former house of Edwin B. Crocker, a wealthy Sacramento lawyer. Edwin bought the property in 1868 and had the existing building extensively renovated for his family’s home and a separate gallery constructed to hold the family’s art collection. When Edwin died in 1875 his wife, Margaret, gave the city the gallery and the art collection. Shortly before her death in 1900 she donated the mansion to the Peniel Rescue Mission. In 1911 Crocker’s daughter, Jennie, contributed $10,000 to the city so that the mansion could be bought and used along with the gallery to display the art collection. As the collection grew over the years even more room was needed so a modern addition was added in 2010.

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  The Crockers collected 16th and 17th-century Dutch, Flemish and Italian paintings and contemporary California paintings. The museum has added ceramics, African, Oceanic, Asian and American art. We especially enjoyed the modern art galleries. The mansion is a work of art itself with wonderful architectural details.

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   The museum is accessible. A couple of the changing exhibit galleries have heavy doors and plush carpeting but the rest of the galleries have push button doors or no doors and hard flooring.

  Most of the parking is angled on the street parking. Very small RVs and vans will fit. We found two spaces together along the curb at the corner of 2nd St. and O St.  RVs will also fit in the parking lot at the corner of 2nd St. and N St. by using two spaces.  Museum

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Friday, May 1, 2015

Sutter's Fort State Historic Park

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  In 1841 John Sutter, a Swiss immigrant, received a land grant of 47,827 acres in the Mexican territory of Alta California from the governor, Juan Bautista Alvarado. By the time California was ceded to the United States in 1848, Sutter owned more than 150,000 acres. Using Native Americans as laborers he became quite prosperous with fields of wheat, barley, peas, beans, cotton and grapes, and large herds of cattle, horses and sheep. Hunters were sent into the mountains for furs pelts and elk hides. A distillery, flour mill, bakery, blacksmith shop, carpenter shop and weaving shop were built along the fort’s outer walls. A boat launch soon carried freight and passengers between Sutter's Fort and the San Francisco Bay.

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  This all ended in 1848 with the discovery of gold in the water raceway of his lumber mill located 45 miles away. Sutter’s settlement was overrun by men who helped themselves to his stock as they passed through on the way to the gold fields. His workmen quit to join in the rush. By late 1849 Sutter had sold his fort and moved to Yuba City.

  Sutter’s fort is much more interesting than a military fort because of all the different activities that occurred within it’s walls. The only original building is the central building which housed Sutter’s living quarters and office. The rest of the fort has been reconstructed just slightly smaller than the original. The workshops and rooms are furnished as they would have been in Sutter’s time. The rooms are viewed from the doorways and recordings explain their function. Several rooms house a small museum.

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The fort is fairly accessible. It’s located on a rise so it’s a slight uphill climb along the packed dirt paths to the entrance. The central building is accessed by steps only but a book of photographs is available to view. Some of sills at the doorways don’t fit flush with the ground. The museum is accessible.

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  Parking is along the street. Check the signs because each street, each side of a street and each section of a street may have different limits and restrictions. Parking is free on Sunday. RVs can fit by using more than one space but it may be necessary to park a block or two away. All of the curb cuts and sidewalks in Sacramento are in excellent condition.  Fort

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California State Indian Museum

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  This is a small museum but the artifacts on display are exceptionally nice. Baskets, beadwork, hunting and fishing tools, and dance regalia from a number of different tribes fill the cases. Large photographs and detailed explanations of family life and customs are included with each tribe’s artifacts. No photography is allowed in the museum.

  Everything is accessible.

  Parking is along the street. Check the signs because each street, each side of a street and each section of a street may have different limits and restrictions. Parking is free on Sunday. RVs can fit by using more than one space but it may be necessary to park a block or two away. All of the curb cuts and sidewalks in Sacramento are in excellent condition.  Museum

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Thursday, April 30, 2015

California Museum

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  California has a very interesting human and geological history plus beautiful and unusual National Parks. The California Museum falls short of telling even a small portion of this story. The exhibits do not flow in a coherent order and although some are very well done so much has been left out that visitors do not get the full scope of California’s colorful history and the natural wonders that are unique to the state.

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  The museum is all accessible.

  Visiting on the weekend makes it easier to find a parking space. The turn into the museum lot is too tight for large vehicles but parking on the street is fine. Check the signs because each street, each side of a street and each section of a street may have different limits and restrictions. Some have free parking on Saturday and some are free on both Saturday and Sunday. It may be necessary to park a block or two away. All of the curb cuts and sidewalks in Sacramento are in excellent condition.  Museum

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California State Capitol Museum and Park

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  The Capitol building, built in 1874, was completely restored in 1982 to it’s 1906 grandeur. There are a few historic displays but the real reason to visit the capitol is see the beautiful restoration and take a stroll through the gardens of the capitol mall. Free tours are given daily, weekends included.

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    The building and the park are completely accessible. Visitors must go through a security check so all the doors are not opened. We entered at the south entrance.

   Visiting on the weekend makes it easier to find a parking space. Check the signs because each street, each side of a street and each section of a street may have different limits and restrictions. Some have free parking are on Saturday and some are free on both Saturday and Sunday. It may be necessary to park a block or two away. All of the curb cuts and sidewalks in Sacramento are in excellent condition.  Capitol

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Wednesday, April 29, 2015

Sierra College Natural History Museum

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  This is a very small museum located in the center hall of the Sewell Hall building on the college campus. Displays include dozens of mounted animals and many fossils. Admission is free.

   The museum is accessible. The paths and roads on the campus are accessible.

  Park along Rocklin Road in Lot E, F or G. The parking fee is $3.00 during the week, payable at ticket dispensing machines. The machine where Tony paid was not accessible because of it’s location on a small raised platform that could not be reached from a wheelchair but I didn’t check any of the other machines.  Museum
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Dave Moore Nature Area

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  Dave Moore, an avid outdoorsman who worked as a BLM ranger, was stricken with multiple sclerosis at age 35. His coworkers developed this area and built a one mile loop trail so that Dave and other people with physical challenges could enjoy nature. Unfortunately either the trail has deteriorated over the years or it wasn’t built to any standard in the first place because it is not accessible. We started on the trail at the far end of the parking lot and made it to where we could get a little peek at the river through the trees. The trail runs slightly down hill. We encountered washed out sections, roots and small rocks. We also tried going in the opposite direction by taking the trail from the other end of the parking lot. From that direction we came to some very steep sections with large rocks in the middle of the trail. It’s a nice little trail with good access to the American River but only if you’re able-bodied.

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   The parking lot is large enough for any RV.  Trail

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Tuesday, April 28, 2015

Blogging Friends on the Way to Alaska!

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  It’s always a pleasure to meet fellow travelers and especially nice  to have a face to face meeting with travelers whom we’ve become friends with online. However there’s always a tiny bit of trepidation – do we really have anything in common, will we even like each other, are they nefarious criminals planning dastardly deeds? :-D   Not to fear – our meet ups have ranged from interesting to very enjoyable, with most at the later end of the spectrum. So when blogger friend, Dave and his wife Marcia, and Tony and I happened to be in the same place at the same time we were looking forward to finally meeting them. Little attention was paid to the food (although it was very good) as we sat around a restaurant table for over four hours  but we got a lot of talking and laughing in. We were having so much fun that I forgot to take any pictures so I had to steal a couple from Dave’s blog. :-)

Dave and Marcia are on their way to Alaska, a trip that was planned for last spring but unfortunately the storage area where they kept their RV caught on fire. By the time they found a replacement motorhome it was too late to go all the way to Alaska so the trip had to be postponed but they’re on their way this year! I think the trip officially starts at the end of May. Follow along on their blog - http://goingrvway.blogspot.com/

  Have a great trip Dave and Marcia! See you down the road!